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CONTENTS

CHAPTER I

INTRODUCTORY—Sources of information—Old building accounts—Books of
agriculture and topography—Glossaries and dictionaries—Buildings and
their occupiers—Preservation of buildings . . . . . 1—6

CHAPTER II

PRIMITIVE FORMS OF BUILDING—Flakes—Conical huts of wood and turf
in England and on the Continent of Europe—Oblong huts—The ridge
pole—Its history and its influence in later constructions . 7—14

CHAPTER III

PRIMITIVE FORMS OF BUILDING (contz'm¢ed)—Upright forked poles—Their
world-wide use in building—Furcae of gallows, etc—Buildings rect-
angular in plan—Forks in old German and Scandinavian buildings—
Variety of forked construction in Jutland . . . . 15—22

CHAPTER IV

CURVED TREE PRINCIPALS—The German roof-hut—lts allies in Scandinavia
and in England—The old cottages of Snowdonia—Principals formed of
curved trees in England—Their names in the English dialects—Their
use in buildings and their principal varieties—Preparation of timber
where felled—Studs and stooths—Siles and gavelforks . . 23—61

CHAPTER V

CURVED TREE PRINCIPALS (caiztz'rzuefl—Separation of the wall post and the
principal rafter—Economy in the use of m'aterials—Mediaeval roofs in
churches and large barns—Ancient Irish oratories of stone—The
pointed arch . . . . . . . . . . 62—72

CHAPTER Vl

FULLY-DEVELOPED TIMBER BUILDINGS—Anglo-Norman roofs and their
descendants—Re-use of timber in building—Post and truss buildings—
Their use in the sixteenth century—Roof trusses and their principal
varieties . . . . . . . . . . 73—81

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