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LORD CLIVE. 57

the Colonel! I, who never get up in the morning without
making three low bows to his jackass!” This was hardly an
exaggeration. Europeans and natives were alike at Clive’s feet.
The English regarded" him as the only man who could force
Meer J afiier to keep his engagements with them. Meer J aflier
regarded him as the only man who could protect the new
dynasty against turbulent subjects and encroaching neighbours.

It is but justice to say that Clive used his power ably and
vigorously for the advantage of . his country. He sent forth an
expedition against the tract lying to the north of the Carnatic.
In this tract the French still had the aseendency; and it was
important to dislodge them. The conduct of the enterprise was
intrusted to an otficer of the name of Forde, who was then little
known, but in whom the keen eye of the governor had detected
military talents of a high order. The success of the expedition
was rapid and splendid.

While a considerable part of the army of Bengal was thus en-
gaged at a distance, a new and formidable danger menaced the
western frontier. The Great Mogul was a prisoner at Delhi in
the hands of a subject. His eldest son, named Shah Alum, des-
tined to be, during many years, the sport of adverse fortune,
and to be a. tool in the hands, lirst of the Mahrattas, and then
of the English, had fled from the palace of his father. Ilis birth
was still revered in India. Some powerful princes, the Nabob
of Oude in particular, were inclined to favour him. Shah

Alum found it easy to draw to his standard great numbers of

the military adventurers with whom every part of the country
swarmed. An army of forty thousand men, of various races
and religions, Mahrattas, Rohillas, Jauts, and Afghans, was
speedily assembled round him; and he formed the design of
overthrowing the upstart whom the English had elevated to
a throne, and of establishing his own authority throughout
Bengal, Orissa, and Bahar.

Meer Jaffier’s terror was extreme; and the only expedient

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