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LORD CLIVE. 71

good-will of all the English in Bengal, by giving up to their

rapacity a helpless and timid race, who knew not where lay the

island which sent forth their oppressors, and whose complaints

had little chance of being heard across fifteen thousand miles of
ocean. He knew that if he applied himself in earnest to the

work of reformation, he should raise every bad passion in arms

against him. He knew how unscrupulous, how implacable,

would be the hatred of those ravenous adventurers who, having
counted on accumulating in a few months fortunes sufficient to
support peerages, should find all their hopes frustrated. But he
had chosen the good part; and he called up all the force of his
mind for a battle far harder than that of Plassey. At first
success seemed hopeless; but soon all obstacles began to bend
before that iron courage and that vehement will. The re-
ceiving of presents from the natives was rigidly prohibited.
The private trade of the servants of the Company was put down.
The whole settlement seemed to be set, as one man, against
these measures. But the inexorable governor declared that, if
he could not find support at Fort William, he would procure
it elsewhere, and sent for some civil servants from Madras to
assist him in carrying on the administration. The most fac-
tions of his opponents he turned out of their offices. The rest
submitted to what was inevitable; and in a very short time all
resistance was quelled.

But Clive was far too wise a man not to see that the recent
abuses were partly to be ascribed to a cause which could not
fail to produce similar abuses, as soon as the pressure of his
strong band was withdrawn. The Company had followed 9.
mistaken policy with respect to the remuneration of its servants.
The salaries were too low to afford even those indulgences
which are necessary to the health and comfort of Europeans in
a tropical climate. To lay by a rupee from such scanty pay was
impossible. It could not be supposed that men of even average

abilities would consent to pass the best years of life in exile,
E 4

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