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60 LORD CLIVE.

English ministers could not wish to see a war with Holland
added to that in which they were already engaged with France;
that they might disavow his acts ; that they might punish him.
He had recently remitted a great part of his fortune to Europe,
through the Dutch East India Company; ‘and he had therefore
a strong interest in avoiding any quarrel. But he was satisfied
that, if he suffered the Batavian armament to pass up the river
and to join the garrison of Chinsurah, Meer Jaflier would
throw himself into the arms of these new allies, and that the
English ascendency in Bengal would be exposed to most serious
danger. He took his resolution with characteristic boldness,
and was most ably seconded by his officers, particularly by
Colonel Forde, to whom the most important part of the ope-
rations was intrusted. The Dutch attempted to force a passage.
The English encountered them both by land and water. On
both elements the enemy had a great superiority of force. On
both they were signally defeated. Their ships were taken.
Their troops were put to a total rout. Almost all the European
soldiers, who constituted the main strength of the invading
army, were killed or taken. The conquerors sat down before
Chinsurah; and the chiefs of that settlement, now thoroughly
humbled, consented to the terms which Clive dictated. They
engaged to build no fortifications, and to raise no troops beyond
a small force necessary for the police of their factories; and it
was distinctly provided that any violation of these covenants
should be punished with instant expulsion from Bengal.

Three months after this great victory, Clive sailed for Eng-
land. At home, honours and rewards awaited him, not indeed
equal to his claims or to his ambition, but still such as, when
his age, his rank in the army, and his original place in society
are considered, must be pronounced rare and splendid. He was
raised to the Irish peerage, and encouraged to expect an English
title. George the Third, who had just ascended the throne,
received him with great distinction. The ministers paid him

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