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AN ADDRESS TO STUDENTS. 101

a hundred millions of miles distant, can be brought virtually
into our closets and there subjected to examination. It
has its winds and clouds, its rain and frost, its light, heat,
sound, electricity, and magnetism. And it has its vast
kingdoms of animals and vegetables. To a most amazing
extent the human mind has conquered these things, and
revealed the logic which runs through them. Were they
facts only, without logical relationship, science might, as a
means of discipline, suffer in comparison with language.
But the whole body of phenomena is instinct with law;
the facts are hung on principles, and the value of physical
science as a means of discipline consists in the motion of
the intellect, both inductively and dedu’ctively, along the
lines of law marked out by phenomena. As regards that
discipline to which I have already referred as derivable
from the study of languages—that, and more, are involved
in the study of physical science. Indeed, I believe it would
be possible so to limit and arrange the study of a portion
of physics as to render the mental exercise involved in it
almost qualitatively the same as that involved in the un-
ravelling of a language.

I have thus far limited myself to the purely intellectual
side of this question. But man is not all intellect. If he
were so, science would, I believe, be his proper nutriment.
But he feels as well as thinks; he is receptive of the sub-
lime and the beautiful as well as of the true. Indeed, I be-
lieve that even the intellectual action of a complete, man is,
consciously or unconsciously, sustained by an under-current
of the emotions. It is vain, I think, to attempt to separate
moral and emotional nature from intellectual nature. Let
a man but observe himself, and he will, if I mistake not,
find that in nine cases out of ten, moral or immoral consid-
erations, as the case may be, are the motive force which
pushes his intellect into action. The reading of the works
of two men,.neither of them imbued with the spirit of

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