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AN ADDRESS TO STUDENTS. 103

tion. Let me illustrate this point. There are in the min-
eral world certain crystals, certain forms, for instance, of
fluor-spar, which have lain darkly in the earth for ages, but
which nevertheless have a potency of light locked up within
them. In their case the potential has never become actual——
the light is in fact held back by a molecular detent. When
these crystals are warmed, the detent is lifted, and an out-
flow of light immediately begins. I know not how many
of you may be in the condition of this fluor-spar. For aught
I know, every one of you may be in this condition, requiring
out the proper agent to be applied—the proper word to be
spoken—to remove a detent, and to render you conscious
of light within yourselves and sources of light to others.
The circle of human nature, then, is not complete with-
out the arc of feeling and emotion. The lilies of the field
have a value for us beyond their botanical ones—a certain
lightening of the heart accompanies the declaration that
“ Solomon in all his glory was not arrayed like one of these.”
The sound of the village bell which comes mellowed from
the valley to the traveller upon the hill, has a value beyond
its acoustical one. The setting sun when it mantles with
the bloom of roses the alpine snows, has a value beyond its
Optical one. The starry heavens, as you know, had for Im-
manuel Kant a value beyond their astronomical one. Round
about the intellect sweeps the horizon of emotions from
which all our noblest impulses are derived. I think it very
desirable to keep this horizon open; not to permit either
priest or philosopher to draw down his shutters between
you and it. And here the dead languages, which are sure
to be beaten by science in the purely intellectual fight, have
an irresistible claim. They supplement the work of science
by exalting and refining the aesthetic faculty, and must on
this account be cherished by all who desire to see human
culture complete. There must be a reason for the fascina-
tion which these languages have so long exercised upon

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