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LORD CLIVE. 35

South Sea year, a feverish excitement, an ungovernable im-
patience to be rich, a contempt for slow, sure, and moderate
gains.

At the head of the preponderating party in the India House,
had long stood a powerful, able, and ambitious director of the
name of Sulivan. He had conceived a strong jealousy of Clive,
and remembered with bitterness the audacity with which the
late governor of Bengal had repeatedly set at nought the
authority of the distant Directors of the Company. An ap-
parent reconciliation took place after Clive’s arrival; but enmity
remained deeply rooted in the hearts of both. The whole body
of Directors was then chosen annually. At the election of
1763, Clive attempted to break down the power of the dominant
faction. The contest was carried on with a violence which he
describes as tremendous. Sulivan was victorious, and hastened
to take his revenge.- The grant of rent which Clive had re-
ceived from Meer J aflier was, in the opinion of the best English
lawyers, valid. It had been made by exactly the same authority
from which the Company had received their chief possessions
in Bengal, and the Company had long acquiesced in it. The
Directors, however, most unjustly determined to confiscate it,
and Clive was forced to file a bill in Chancery against them.

But a great and sudden turn in affairs was at hand. Every
ship from Bengal had for some time brought alarming tidings.
The internal misgovernment of the province had reached such
a point that it could go'no further. What, indeed, was to be
expected from a body of public servants exposed to temptation
such that, as Clive once said, flesh and blood could not bear it,
armed with irresistible power, and responsible only to the
corrupt, turbulent, distracted, ill informed Company, situated
at such a distance that the average interval between the sending
of a despatch and the receipt of an answer was above a year
and a half ? Accordingly, during the five years which followed
the departure of Clive from Bengal, the misgovernment of the

E

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